Co-creation of Knowledge in Technology-Enhanced Communities of Learning

Studies

Studies

Studies

 

In the past two decades, online social networking sites (SNS) have become autonomous tracts of discourse. These sites significantly impact the identity of youths, as participation in these SNSs allows children and adolescents to assume and experiment with roles and rules in the virtual sphere. Moreover, it constitutes an opportunity for expanding their social and cultural horizons. The scholarship on this topic has focused on displays of individualism (Boyd, 2014; Stern, 2007), but there is a dearth of research concerning the institutional development of these neworks. Addressing this lacuna, this research study investigates the leadership styles of young girls in youth movements, with an emphasis on internet contexts. More specifically, this project delves into the activity of female counselors on SNSs and their online social performance. What is more, we explore how counselors perceive these networks, especially in all that concerns the construction of their leadership identity.

 

To this end, the project hones in on the Israeli Scouts movement. Preliminary fieldwork suggests that young girl scouts frequently use a variety of SNS platforms to connect with their peer group and charges-cum-apprentices. Counselors were found to have multiple Instagram profiles that are dedicated to communicating with, among others, apprentices, peers, and all members of the branch. In addition, they maintain Facebook groups and Snapchat accounts for sending messages, interacting with the environment, and sundry internet uses. For these young girls, the various SNS outlets help them develop their personal and leadership identities in a social arena that is informed by a free and supportive environment.